haiku

Haiku queue

It wasn’t cabin fever that pushed me to go outside today, but rather my frustration with a work assignment that did. I needed to get out and walk.

As I made my way back home, I came up with the following description: Went on a much needed walk and came across spring. It turns out the description can be split into two stanzas, seven syllables and five syllables, respectively. I was onto a haiku without knowing it.

It’s interesting how I always seem to come up with the last two stanzas of a haiku and always have trouble with the first. It happens to me often. I know I have a list of unfinished haiku somewhere.

despite all of this
went on a much needed walk
and came across spring

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haiku

Street poetry

I was about to cross the street when I noticed a pattern all too familiar — 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables. A haiku.

I was taken aback and, out of excitement, pulled my friend out of traffic for her to see it. I was ecstatic.

You see, haiku have been a thing. I wrote three of them the day before and was already in the practice of counting my thoughts’ syllables. Now, the syllables were in front of me.

This haiku is by John Morse and is part of the NYC Department of Transportation’s Curbside Haiku, a safety education program and public art campaign that’s dispersed throughout the city.

It was a weekend of poetry, and I could not have been happier.

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haiku

Counting syllables

I wrote three haiku this morning, the most I’ve ever written in a day (I’m still surprised myself). They all came out of my journey to NYC today.

I was hesitant to leave the house without my camera out of fear that I’d be missing out on the opportunity to take some cool pics, but something inside me didn’t want to.

my inner writer
doesn’t want to take pictures
she just wants to write

Because I was running late, I was half-expecting (or more so convinced) that I wouldn’t make it to the bus terminal in time. I thought I had two more stops to go.

it’s one stop away
that alone gave me some hope
as long as I ran

I made it (with literally a minute to spare, no lie) and settled in. An hour into the trip, I began writing and came across a blog post that got me thinking.

I tend to latch on
to things I do not want
out of fear of loss

Interestingly enough, I came across this and the morning went full circle.

@davidshrigley
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Uncategorized

The only, a haiku

Here’s this week’s haiku to set the mood. It took me more than an hour to come up the first two lines, but they flow really nicely.

I maneuvered through Monday morning with this thought: I really am only here, so I will be mentally present where I am, because that’s all there is.

I am very imaginative and have a tendency to be in my head, picturing myself everywhere else but where I am.

It sounds dreamy (and it literally is!), but it actually hurts me when I don’t have an anchor — something to remind me that out of all the imagined scenarios and places I can see myself in, my life is right here, right now in Boston.

This haiku is for the dreamers out there like myself.

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